Author Topic: Computer Vision Syndrome  (Read 831 times)

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Offline rpmolecule

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Computer Vision Syndrome
« on: April 19, 2009, 11:51:23 PM »
Sharing this article for those who are visually impaired. we need to be careful with what we don.. and abuse of our eyes... we need rest din pa minsan minsan...


read this..

Computer Vision Syndrome
By Richard L. Nepomuceno, MD



Through the years, the availability and necessity of computers have increased beyond our usual understanding of how we can safely use them. As such, new occupational health hazards have arisen. Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) is one such entity. A more specific form of eye strain due to computer use, it is characterized by one or all of the following eye symptoms: redness, dryness, slight itchiness, tearing, difficulty in focusing, heaviness of the eyelids, brow or forehead. These symptoms can eventually cause headaches, backaches, and muscle spasms. Though many suffer from this, only a small fraction of the work force actually consult their eye doctors for it. The rest toil under the burden of ignorance.

For a person with uncorrected vision of 20/20, the eye’s relaxed state is achieved whenever one looks at a distance of about 20 feet or more. Looking at anything within an arm’s length forces the eye muscles to “accommodate” and staying too long in this state (such as reading the Da Vincci Code in one sitting) causes eye strain. Staring at computer monitors for more than two hours is no different.

In the past, people at work looked down at the desk for reading and writing. Today’s work environment forces an individual to look horizontally at a computer screen. As a consequence, light coming from open windows, ceiling lights, etc can enter directly into the eye and cause glare and discomfort. This contributes heavily to CVS. How does one know if glare is contributing to your eye strain ? While staring at your computer screen, try to identify other bright sources of light along your peripheral vision. Now put your hand over your brow like a sun visor and note any improvement. If your eyes feel less strained, then there is too much glare coming from your surroundings.

What is important is to remove bright sources of light from the field of view and try to achieve a relatively even distribution of luminances or brightness within this field of vision. There are many ways of doing this. Using louvers, one can redirect the light coming from the fixtures to go straight down so as to avoid the eyes. An even better solution would be to bounce the light off the ceiling to produce a large, low luminance source of light for the room. Alternatively, one can switch off the offending light source assuming this does not hamper or bother the rest of your co-workers. Re-orienting or rotating the work station so that the offending light source is moved out of one’s field of vision or using window blinds that are directed upward are also good options. Don’t forget the ubiquitous desk lamp which may be throwing the light right onto the screen or strait into your eyes. Wearing a visor through out the day is a simple way of getting rid of the overhead glare. 

One must also consider the computer screen. Flat panel liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors offer less glare than their cathode ray tube (CRT) counterparts. Using anti-reflecting filters also decreases the amount of irritating reflections coming off the computer screen better than a hood. Note that glass anti-reflection screens are better than mesh screens. Keeping the monitor about 6 to 9 inches below eye level and about 20-26 inches away from the eye truly helps as the natural position of the eyeballs while attempting to read is slightly looking down. Adjusting the computer screen brightness to match the surroundings and/or applying a hood (akin to a sun visor that is placed on the computer monitor instead of a person’s head) over the computer screen should work wonders. The hood extends about 5 inches beyond the front of the computer screen and should cover the top and sides of the computer monitor. Using black text on a white background increases contrast which should increase comfort. Needless to say that dark back grounds should be avoided when using black text. Speaking of text, it’s a good idea to view the text at least three times larger than the smallest size one can read. How can one determine this? One simply sits at three times the usual working distance and STILL be able to read the text. The refresh rate (or how fast the content of the screen is redrawn) of computer monitors should also be adjusted. Sixty hertz may be too low. Any lower value will result in that annoying flicker on your screen. The higher the refresh rate, the easier on the eyes. One might have to sacrifice the gazillion colors just to bring the refresh rates to more acceptable levels. The dot pitch affects the sharpness of the display. The smaller the value, the better. Be that as it may, a 0.25-0.28mm dot pitch is already acceptable.

Now let’s take a look at what we need to do for the person. For a more ergonomic position of the body, adjust your chair and desk such that ones feet are firmly on the ground with a 90-degree angle at the knees. The wrists should also just “float” above a wrist rest while typing, all the while keeping the elbows bent at a 90-degree angle. Adjustable arm rests should do nicely to achieve this. One must also strive to maintain the “hollow” of the back by supporting it with a rolled towel or a cushion if your chair doesn’t have an honest to goodness effective back rest which provides lower back support.

A 10-minute break for every hour of computer use is also recommended. This allows you to stretch your back, neck, arms, legs, etc and relax the eye a bit. Note that one should use this time to look at far away objects (more than 20 feet) so as to relax the “reading muscles”. One must also be conscious about blinking more often. Whenever we stare at something (like the computer screen), the tendency is to blink less often. This results in dry eyes which contribute directly to that feeling of tiredness after prolonged computer use. As a corollary, one must see an eye doctor to make sure that he doesn’t need reading glasses. Forcing the eye to read for prolonged periods of time without the aid of reading glasses when one already needs a pair simply forces the eye to stare and try to focus the letters. This leads to less blinking, dry eye, and eyestrain.

All in all, computer vision syndrome is a very discomforting disease that truly affects productivity and efficiency in the work place. Many of the solutions that can help reduce the effects of CVS don’t cost much (if any). It is an occupational health hazard that should be addressed as it is practically preventable.


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Computer Vision Syndrome
« on: April 19, 2009, 11:51:23 PM »
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Offline Technogear

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Re: Computer Vision Syndrome
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2009, 06:59:26 PM »
HI RPMOLECULE...

thanks for posting this.. i have 175/200 vision ... primarily caused by computer stuffs ..

I thought sharing.. i ve been actually researching for some alternative ways to improve my vision.. i heard taking vitamin A and liver enhancers would improve eyesight so that's what am doing at the moment....

but also been considering lasik surgery...

if you are working with computers, i think it would be best to have a routine check up with your eyes because this is an asset especially when your work is geared towards the computers..

mahirap magkasakit kaya ginagawa ko balance langdin..

di na rin ako naggagames kasi sumasakit mata ko..


Offline fox69

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Re: Computer Vision Syndrome
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2011, 08:58:13 PM »
thanks for this very informative thread ;D


Offline Patrick

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Re: Computer Vision Syndrome
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2013, 07:11:30 PM »
Nag training ako sa isang call center for two months at doon ko napansin na medyo lumabo yung mga mata ko. I'm trying now to get more sleep plus with my work, I don't have to use the computer for a long time.


Offline firefox

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Re: Computer Vision Syndrome
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2014, 12:53:34 AM »
 :)


Offline ME2016

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Re: Computer Vision Syndrome
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2016, 01:04:29 PM »
Ngayon lang ako naging aware dito. salamat Doc!


Sharing this article for those who are visually impaired. we need to be careful with what we don.. and abuse of our eyes... we need rest din pa minsan minsan...


read this..

Computer Vision Syndrome
By Richard L. Nepomuceno, MD



Through the years, the availability and necessity of computers have increased beyond our usual understanding of how we can safely use them. As such, new occupational health hazards have arisen. Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) is one such entity. A more specific form of eye strain due to computer use, it is characterized by one or all of the following eye symptoms: redness, dryness, slight itchiness, tearing, difficulty in focusing, heaviness of the eyelids, brow or forehead. These symptoms can eventually cause headaches, backaches, and muscle spasms. Though many suffer from this, only a small fraction of the work force actually consult their eye doctors for it. The rest toil under the burden of ignorance.

For a person with uncorrected vision of 20/20, the eye’s relaxed state is achieved whenever one looks at a distance of about 20 feet or more. Looking at anything within an arm’s length forces the eye muscles to “accommodate” and staying too long in this state (such as reading the Da Vincci Code in one sitting) causes eye strain. Staring at computer monitors for more than two hours is no different.

In the past, people at work looked down at the desk for reading and writing. Today’s work environment forces an individual to look horizontally at a computer screen. As a consequence, light coming from open windows, ceiling lights, etc can enter directly into the eye and cause glare and discomfort. This contributes heavily to CVS. How does one know if glare is contributing to your eye strain ? While staring at your computer screen, try to identify other bright sources of light along your peripheral vision. Now put your hand over your brow like a sun visor and note any improvement. If your eyes feel less strained, then there is too much glare coming from your surroundings.

What is important is to remove bright sources of light from the field of view and try to achieve a relatively even distribution of luminances or brightness within this field of vision. There are many ways of doing this. Using louvers, one can redirect the light coming from the fixtures to go straight down so as to avoid the eyes. An even better solution would be to bounce the light off the ceiling to produce a large, low luminance source of light for the room. Alternatively, one can switch off the offending light source assuming this does not hamper or bother the rest of your co-workers. Re-orienting or rotating the work station so that the offending light source is moved out of one’s field of vision or using window blinds that are directed upward are also good options. Don’t forget the ubiquitous desk lamp which may be throwing the light right onto the screen or strait into your eyes. Wearing a visor through out the day is a simple way of getting rid of the overhead glare. 

One must also consider the computer screen. Flat panel liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors offer less glare than their cathode ray tube (CRT) counterparts. Using anti-reflecting filters also decreases the amount of irritating reflections coming off the computer screen better than a hood. Note that glass anti-reflection screens are better than mesh screens. Keeping the monitor about 6 to 9 inches below eye level and about 20-26 inches away from the eye truly helps as the natural position of the eyeballs while attempting to read is slightly looking down. Adjusting the computer screen brightness to match the surroundings and/or applying a hood (akin to a sun visor that is placed on the computer monitor instead of a person’s head) over the computer screen should work wonders. The hood extends about 5 inches beyond the front of the computer screen and should cover the top and sides of the computer monitor. Using black text on a white background increases contrast which should increase comfort. Needless to say that dark back grounds should be avoided when using black text. Speaking of text, it’s a good idea to view the text at least three times larger than the smallest size one can read. How can one determine this? One simply sits at three times the usual working distance and STILL be able to read the text. The refresh rate (or how fast the content of the screen is redrawn) of computer monitors should also be adjusted. Sixty hertz may be too low. Any lower value will result in that annoying flicker on your screen. The higher the refresh rate, the easier on the eyes. One might have to sacrifice the gazillion colors just to bring the refresh rates to more acceptable levels. The dot pitch affects the sharpness of the display. The smaller the value, the better. Be that as it may, a 0.25-0.28mm dot pitch is already acceptable.

Now let’s take a look at what we need to do for the person. For a more ergonomic position of the body, adjust your chair and desk such that ones feet are firmly on the ground with a 90-degree angle at the knees. The wrists should also just “float” above a wrist rest while typing, all the while keeping the elbows bent at a 90-degree angle. Adjustable arm rests should do nicely to achieve this. One must also strive to maintain the “hollow” of the back by supporting it with a rolled towel or a cushion if your chair doesn’t have an honest to goodness effective back rest which provides lower back support.

A 10-minute break for every hour of computer use is also recommended. This allows you to stretch your back, neck, arms, legs, etc and relax the eye a bit. Note that one should use this time to look at far away objects (more than 20 feet) so as to relax the “reading muscles”. One must also be conscious about blinking more often. Whenever we stare at something (like the computer screen), the tendency is to blink less often. This results in dry eyes which contribute directly to that feeling of tiredness after prolonged computer use. As a corollary, one must see an eye doctor to make sure that he doesn’t need reading glasses. Forcing the eye to read for prolonged periods of time without the aid of reading glasses when one already needs a pair simply forces the eye to stare and try to focus the letters. This leads to less blinking, dry eye, and eyestrain.

All in all, computer vision syndrome is a very discomforting disease that truly affects productivity and efficiency in the work place. Many of the solutions that can help reduce the effects of CVS don’t cost much (if any). It is an occupational health hazard that should be addressed as it is practically preventable.


 

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